2012 TRADEWISE GIBRALTAR Festival de Ajedrez Lunes 23 de enero – Jueves 02 de febrero 2012

27 enero 2012 | Por Redacción | Categoria: Ajedrez, Otros Deportes

Tradewise Gibraltar Chess 2012

2012 TRADEWISE GIBRALTAR
CHESS FESTIVAL

Monday 23 January – Thursday 2 February 2012

 

PRESS RELEASE 14   27, January 2012

Thursday 26 January 2012 report by Stewart Reuben on Round 3 of the Masters

Participation of female players in this congress is very important to the whole ethos of this congress. Our webmaster, Steve Connor, reminded me I intended to comment on the passing of Elaine Pritchard, who died very recently and whose career spanned a major period in women’s chess. In a way, it is fortuitous that the Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival can be regarded as a memorial to her. She was a child prodigy in the late 1930s (which must have been very unusual for a girl in that period). She remembered sitting on Vera Menchik’s knee. Vera was the first-ever Women’s World Champion and won the World Girls title the same year. Elaine won the World Girls in 1936 at the age of 10 and again in 1937. She was British Ladies Champion in 1939, 1946, 1955 and 1965. Her last FIDE Rating was 2150. In her period, women mainly played separately from men. For more details, see:

http://www.englishchess.org.uk/?p=16227.

 

1

GM Short Nigel D

2677

2

1 – 0

2

GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar

2747

2

GM Adams Michael

2724

2

1 – 0

2

GM Fridman Daniel

2660

3

GM Hou Yifan *

2605

2

1 – 0

2

GM Almasi Zoltan

2717

4

GM Le Quang Liem

2714

2

½

2

GM Parligras Mircea-Emilian

2650

5

GM Howell David W L

2603

2

½

2

GM Polgar Judit *

2710

6

GM Koneru Humpy *

2589

2

½

2

GM Laznicka Viktor

2704

7

GM Kulaots Kaido

2581

2

½

2

GM Movsesian Sergei

2700

8

GM Sasikiran Krishnan

2700

2

½

2

GM David Alberto

2598

9

GM Sargissian Gabriel

2683

2

0 – 1

2

GM Brunello Sabino

2581

10

GM Felgaer Ruben

2571

2

1 – 0

2

GM Bologan Viktor

2680

* refers to female

 

Nigel Short ENG v Shakhriyar Mamedyarov AZE

 

Nigel won a very nice, easy game. It was predicted he would reach the Commentary Room by 6.15pm, but he made it by 6.01pm.

 

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 0–0 9.h3 Nb8 10.d3 Nbd7 11.Nbd2 Bb7 12.Nf1 Nc5 13.Bc2 Re8 14.Ng3 Bf8 15.b4 Ne6

(15 Ncd7 is more common)

16.d4 g6 17.Bd2 Nd7 18.Bb3 Qf6 19.d5 Nf4

(Although Black has a nicely placed knight, Nigel felt the rest of his pieces were just in a tangle. The pressure on the c file was unbearable for Black.)

20.c4 Nb6 21.Rc1 bxc4 22.Bxc4 Nxc4 23.Rxc4 Rac8 24.Qc2

 

 

 

 

24…Be7 (24…Nxh6ch seems attractive. But there follows 25 gxh6 Qxf6 26 Bg5 trapping the queen.)  25.Bxf4 exf4 26.Ne2 Bd8 27.Ned4 Rb8 28.Qa4 Kf8 29.Nc6 Bxc6 30.Rxc6 Qb2 31.a3 f5 32.e5 1–0

In the final position, Black’s queen is all dressed up with nowhere to go.

 

Michael Adams ENG v Daniel Fridman GER

 

It is heart-warming to see the two leading English players on the top two boards in the Masters. Even better, they both won. What could be more appropriate in this extremely patriotic setting? Michael sacrificed a pawn in return for weakening Black’s kingside, a very long-term plan indeed. His handling of the delicate endgame put Black under so much pressure that he eventually won. 53 move games don’t usually win the £1000 Best Game Prize, but this could be the exception.

 

Hou Yifan CHN v Zoltan Almasi HUN

 

Another elegant game played by Hou Yifan, the 17 year old Women’s World Chess Champion. The Berlin Wall is regarded as virtually impregnable, but she chipped away at its foundations.

 

Le Quang Liem VIE v Mircea-Emilian Parligras  ROU

 

Basically they shuffled around until the music stopped. But doing nothing extremely well is a characteristic of very strong players.

 

Alexei Shirov LAT v Mariya Muzychuk UKR

Alexei again came to the Commentary Room as did Emanuel Berg. Thus we got three master classes that afternoon. He was very surprised by 24…Kf8. It was a nice positional crush.

 

Peter Svidler RUS v Anna Muzychuk SLO

She took the fight to the Russian, sacking a pawn early on. This was returned and it then came down to a drawn endgame.

 

David Howell ENG v Judit Polgar HUN

Black seemed better initially, but not after the mutual time scramble. The fortunes of the game ebbed and waned and it concluded after 82 moves with only kings on the  board.

 

Gabriel Sargissian ARM v Sabino Brunello ITA

100 rated points difference isn’t all that much, so Black’s win was not a shocking surprise. The Armenian went wrong with 38 bxa6 and after this was unable to recover.

 

BLITZ TEAMS OF FOUR CHAMPIONSHIP

 

This traditional event attracted 20 teams of 4 players in 6 rounds. They played at the rate of 4 minutes per game plus 4 seconds cumulatively for each move. That works out at about 8 minutes for the whole game for each player, or an average of 8 seconds per move. This is considered quite leisurely for such an event.

 

The team USSR Mixed Team were red hot favourites. It consisted of Peter Svidler 2749 RUS, Viktor Bologan 2680 Moldova, Nadezhda Kosintseva woman 2537 RUS, Natalia Zhukova 2426 UKR.

 

USSR Mixed 20½ game points, 12 match points

Arabic Dragon 15½ game points, 8 match points

Linares Team 15 game points, 9 match points

 

In addition to the 3 hours of this event some people also played 4 hours in the morning and 5 hours in the evening.

 

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